Start of Microsoft's slide?

A couple articles caught my attention recently on some of the new stuff we can expect from Redmond in the next while—Globetechnology- Microsoft puts Office on autopilot –Voidstar – Why Longhorn will be the end of MS
MS Office.  Wow, I remember when you could still get it on
floppy.  Lots of floppies in the last release I had to install
around 10 years ago.  So, Office 12 is going to make life easier
for us by automatically suggesting things for us as we work. 
Interesting.  That's going to come at a price, though. 
Memory and CPU demands are going to start getting extreme. 
There's planned obsolescence and then there is just waste.  I have
a seemingly perfectly serviceable laptop.  A 30 gig HD, 512 megs
of RAM, P4M running at over a GHz.  Should still be okay for me,
right?  Nope.  The drive is getting full.  Memory is
tight often.  The CPU maxes out a lot.
 
Yes,
I'm a power user.  Yes, I tend to run a lot of apps and
widgets.  But all I see with Office 12 is the problem that many
people are going to find, their machines can't handle it without and
upgrade or a whole new box.  Let's not even consider the corporate
environment where the computers are planned to have a 5-7 year life and
the machines at the top end are only a bit more than needed at the
time.  Office 12 isn't going to go over well.
 
Then
there is Longhorn/Vista.  Am I honestly looking forward to
this?  No.  Frankly no.  This spring I'm going to be
reaching the end of my lease with this machine.  I keep debating
Mac, Linux, Windows.  Yes, I've gotten rather used to
Windows.  Like it?  Yeah, a bit.  I know my next
machine is going to be pretty high-end.  Will it be running
Vista?  The points on Voidstar are seriously worth
considering.  Myself I recently had to completely wipe and rebuilt
a laptop for a friend because for some strange reason we couldn't get
highspeed internet to work (it would connect, but couldn't resolve
domains).  Took me a long time to wipe it and rebuilt it for
her.  I dread having to do it again for anyone else.
 
So,
Microsoft, here's a challenge.  Make a nice, compact OS that is
memory efficient and space efficient.  Make apps that don't have
20 different bells and 60 whistles, 90% of which people never, ever
use.  Then people might really enjoy computers, instead of them being objects of frustration.
 
 
Powered By Qumana

Comments

  1. Anonymous says

    I accidentially deleted this …
    Hi Tris:
    I see two almost polar views on the issue of whither Microsoft.
    As for me, I remember standing in line at the Incredible Universe store in l995 to get my hands on Windows 95 and Office 95. The place was a zoo and, if memory serves me correctly, Angelina Jolie was there.
    Over the past decade I have followed the general outlines of the Microsoft upgrade road-map (skipping things like Windows ME) but I never felt the excitement I felt looking forward to Windows 95 and Office 95.
    I have been spending a lot of time reviewing what's on tap from Microsoft over the next year to eighteen months and I'm happy to say that the excitement is back. I'll move to Vista and Office 12 the first minute that I able to do so.
    By analogy, I wouldn?t want Qumana to stop developing just because it might require a bit more RAM or CPU cycles. No. I want the team to appear at Gnomedex next year and knock our socks off.
    As far as I?m concerned, the increasing capability and decreasing cost of hardware has significantly diminished its role regardless of platform, applications, etc. in orders of magnitude that I would never have dreamt of in l995 when I paid some life-draining price for a 1 gig hard drive.
    I don?t anticipate any giant hit regarding hardware requirements. In fact, I?m sure the box I am using now will be fine. That doesn?t mean I don?t or won?t upgrade hardware. I constantly upgrade hardware now – even between Microsoft software upgrades because of the great new things the hardware allows me to do.

  2. Anonymous says

    I accidentially deleted this …
    Hi Tris:
    I see two almost polar views on the issue of whither Microsoft.
    As for me, I remember standing in line at the Incredible Universe store in l995 to get my hands on Windows 95 and Office 95. The place was a zoo and, if memory serves me correctly, Angelina Jolie was there.
    Over the past decade I have followed the general outlines of the Microsoft upgrade road-map (skipping things like Windows ME) but I never felt the excitement I felt looking forward to Windows 95 and Office 95.
    I have been spending a lot of time reviewing what's on tap from Microsoft over the next year to eighteen months and I'm happy to say that the excitement is back. I'll move to Vista and Office 12 the first minute that I able to do so.
    By analogy, I wouldn?t want Qumana to stop developing just because it might require a bit more RAM or CPU cycles. No. I want the team to appear at Gnomedex next year and knock our socks off.
    As far as I?m concerned, the increasing capability and decreasing cost of hardware has significantly diminished its role regardless of platform, applications, etc. in orders of magnitude that I would never have dreamt of in l995 when I paid some life-draining price for a 1 gig hard drive.
    I don?t anticipate any giant hit regarding hardware requirements. In fact, I?m sure the box I am using now will be fine. That doesn?t mean I don?t or won?t upgrade hardware. I constantly upgrade hardware now – even between Microsoft software upgrades because of the great new things the hardware allows me to do.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>